Tag Archives: Life

200 days

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200 days.

Being a perfectionist, of course, it had to be precisely 200 days.

Six months and nineteen days between my first multiple sclerosis symptoms and its very diagnosis.

Little did I know that it would eventually transform my life.

It was September 2004, and I had just dropped off my mother at Dublin Airport for her return to Belgium. On the way home, a strange sensation took hold of the left side of my face, as if it had been injected with thick rubber. Thinking nothing of it, I went back to bed to catch up on lost ZZZs.

I slept for hours.

And hours. Continue reading

Then & now

While events on the political world stage the last few months weren’t exactly vivacious or dignified, a lot has happened in and outside my own colourful, little Irish bubble also. I didn’t have a foul-mouthed Donald Trump breaking down my every word, but I equally didn’t have an eloquent Obama and Air Force One to drag me away from crime-ridden, questionable places. “Life,” in a way was, just like Einstein once said, “like riding a bicycle. To keep your balance, you must keep moving.”

Even while moving, however, at times I felt the pedals slip from under my feet, resulting in losing balance mid-air. Ungracefully, so. Continue reading

Let’s be frank

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“Life is 10% what happens to you and 90% how you react to it.”
(Charles Swindoll)

If you’re running behind on making a few new year’s resolutions, or perhaps call them ‘new year’s illusions’ by now instead, all is not lost. There are small things you can work on every day of the year.

Given its absurd sense of unpredictability, life with MS is challenging at the best of times. Anything turbulent added to it, and it soon becomes a slalom course with so many twists and turns that each one seems icier than the ones before. Continue reading

10 years: a lot to be thankful for

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Ten years ago today, and 2.5 years after moving to Ireland, I was diagnosed with MS, an incurable, neurodegenerative illness that would change my life in ways I never imagined. Needless to say, it was an unwelcome event. Little did I know, however, that it would eventually lead to a life well lived.

There was no manual that showed me how to adapt, accept and live with a chronic illness. MS, associated with 50+ different symptoms, impacts each patient differently. There are numerous symptoms I might never have at all, and that in itself gives hope. Continue reading

Oh, yes, the Blog Awards irony!

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No, not really.

Oh the irony! That pure, untainted irony that just sits there grimacing at my lack of energy and overabundance of trigeminal neuralgia, today of all days!

“What?” you ask.

You who spends time with me, you know that I often live with sarcasm – I’m still DSF, a Delightfully Sarcastic Female after all. Not only that, tonight I feel cursed. Continue reading

Wise words

While I’m not a religious person, I do respect others who are. Perhaps with the dawn of Pope Francis, I am starting to feel more open to experiencing religion. It was with this in mind that I stumbled onto a nice poem by Pope Francis that I wish to share. So for everyone, religious or not, this poem is for you. Enjoy as I have enjoyed reading it and feel free to share and reblog.

Don’t cry for what you lost,
fight for what you have.
Don’t cry for the dead,
fight for what was born in you.
Don’t cry for those who abandoned you,
fight for who’s with you.
Don’t cry for who hates you,
fight for what you want.
Don’t cry for your past,
your present struggle.
Don’t cry for your suffering,
struggle for your happiness.
With the things that are happening
to us, we are learning
that nothing is impossible to
solve, just move on.
(Pope Francis)

© WVE and Ireland, MS and Me, 2011-2014. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner is strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to WVE and Ireland, MS and Me with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

A Dog's Life, by Jonathan Robin

Sixteen years, now almost seventeen,
I’ve played at stick and ball, stayed seldom still
until good master’s call would whistle shrill
to lead me back – no need to smack. Sight keen.

Sixteen years tail’s wagged as faithful friend,
as boon companion, running round fun years.
His mother passed away, I shared the tears
that fountained forth and never seemed to end.

Sixteen years round each revolving moon
from hearth and home I pick up slightest sound,
ears prick, eyes bright, in sight I’m always found
to hold my ground, though often play buffoon. Continue reading

Faith in Ireland

Good things sometimes fall apart so better things can fall together. This is the case for people aiming to improve their lives, careers and relationships after hardship happens. Sometimes they get there from the word ‘go’ while others may require more time to reach their destination.

Having faith is often necessary to be successful and no matter what you believe in – Catholicism, Buddhism, Islam, atheism or any other religion – belief will somehow be present in your life. If you don’t believe in your own strength, how will you be able to convince the world that you really can obtain higher goals?

With having faith however, self-deception can lurk between the cracks of your floorboards so be careful and understand that your mind is a very powerful tool. Too often, we see the result of extremism in faith, religion and in tradition; too often wrongly translated into actions that defy other people’s belief systems. Continue reading

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