Tag Archives: Demyelinating Diseases

MS News: March 2017

Please allow me some nepotism and introduce you to the honourable American/Irish author and my friend Trevis Gleason! He penned a fantastic, witty, humorous and moving memoir about a very unexpected MS diagnosis, ending an old and starting a new career and fulfilling his dream of living in Ireland. You can buy his book here:

  1. Chef Interrupted: Discovering Life’s Second Course in Ireland with Multiple Sclerosis

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clinical-trials

Highlight still on American Healthcare Act, the replacement plan for the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) released by Congress on March 6, 2017

  1. Society Releases Statement on American Health Care Act
  2. National MS Society Urges Lawmakers to Oppose American Health Care Act
  3. Reducing Out-of-Pocket Cost Barriers to Specialty Drug Use Under Medicare Part D: Addressing
  4. Researchers find patients’ annual financial burden under Medicare Part D is ‘too much too soon’

New book by the honourable American/Irish author and friend Trevis Gleason!

  1. Chef Interrupted: Discovering Life’s Second Course in Ireland with Multiple Sclerosis

Highlight!

  1. Blood Diagnostic Test for Multiple Sclerosis to be Released in May 2017

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Man up!

screenshot-www-canva-com-2017-01-15-20-38-57During another stimulating chat with one of my ex-college friends, we found out that both our subject of non-admiration is Michael O’Reilly, one of Ireland’s Olympics boxing competitors who was sent home following a failed doping test during the first week of the Games. He knowingly travelled to Rio and although exempt from fighting for a title already, he kept silent for a week. Eventually, he admitted that he “unintentionally took a supplement that may have contained a prohibited substance given to him by someone unrelated to his team or association.”

Of course, by adding that he was “given the substance by someone else,” MOR is not taking full responsibility for the issue. It would be my understanding, though, that if you want to be an Olympic athlete, you don’t jeopardise your place by “unintentionally” taking things but also, that you need to be aware of everything that goes into your system. Passing on the blame in doping cases often smells like self-pity cloaked in a sense of entitlement and egotism. Continue reading

Positive MS News: September 2014

image multiple sclerosis header news

It has been a big and very busy September for researchers, clinical trials and pharmaceutical companies. Early this month, the Joint ACTRIMS/ECTRIMS Meeting took place in Boston. For more, please check the extensive website of the conference. Continue reading

History of MS: 19th century

Jean Martin Charcot, 188619th century

Until the early years of the 19th century, physicians relied on superstition, hearsay, and “the wisdom of the ancients” to care for the sick. Medical ideas were not scientifically tested. Even so, physicians were often good observers and we can look back today and identify people who undoubtedly had MS from descriptions written as long ago as the Middle Ages.

Drawings from autopsies done as early as 1838 clearly show what we now recognize as MS. Then, in 1868, Jean-Martin Charcot, a professor at the University of Paris who has been called “the father of neurology,” carefully examined a young woman with a tremor of a sort he had never seen before. He noted her other neurological problems including slurred speech and abnormal eye movements, and compared them to other patients he had seen.

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History of MS: 1900 – 1960

CC120th century

In the 19th century, scientists first learned that bacteria cause many diseases. As the 20th century began, they discovered even smaller organisms, viruses, and developed techniques for growing and studying bacteria and viruses in the laboratory. This later led to research on viral causes of MS.

In 1906, the Nobel Prize for Medicine was awarded to Dr. Camillo Golgi and Dr. Santiago Ramon y Cajal, who perfected new chemicals to enhance the visibility of nerve cells under the microscope. With this new technology now available, Dr. James Dawson at the University of Edinburgh in 1916 performed detailed microscopic examinations of the brains of patients who had died with MS. Continue reading

MS Organisations

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Can Do Multiple Sclerosis

Consortium of Multiple Sclerosis Centers

European Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis

European Multiple Sclerosis Platform

HealthCare Journey

MS-UK

MS Trust

Multiple Sclerosis Discovery Forum

Multiple Sclerosis Foundation

Multiple Sclerosis International Federation

Shift.ms

ThisIsMS

©Willeke Van Eeckhoutte and Ireland, MS and Me, 2011-2016. Unauthorised use and/or duplication of this material without express and written permission from this blog’s author and/or owner are strictly prohibited. Excerpts and links may be used, provided that full and clear credit is given to WVE and Ireland, MS and Me with appropriate and specific direction to the original content.

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